Birds That Are Blue – The Top 12 Most Beautiful Ones

There are many blue-colored birds out there, but not all of them are blue. Birds that are blue can be found in many different corners of the world, and it is important to know what blue birds you live with so you can appreciate their natural beauty.

Birds that are blue can be found all over the world and they come in many colors, but the color they have in common is their blueness. Birds that are blue range from those with a light bluish tinge to those with a dark bluish hue.

This essay will cover birds that are blue like the bluest melancholic compilation.
Blue colored birds

Some of the most beautiful birds in existence are blue. The macaw, for example, is one such bird with an array of vibrant hues it can produce from its feathers to match any color around them – not just white like other creatures (unfortunately is the Blue-Throated Macaw almost extinct)!

But what about other types? Are there others out there who aren’t pink or yellow but rather shades between those two extremes that we call “blue”? Well yes indeed…

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak

The Blue Grosbeak is a North American bird that can be found in many different habitats like woodlands, farms, and even gardens. This bird has a blue back, gray head, and white underparts.

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If you find yourself in the forests of North America, be sure to check out these colorful birds. Blue Grosbeaks are typically found at high points like branches or weeds and make use of their prominent colors by sitting still as much as possible when not singing. Their loud call sounds similar to what we would consider metal chink-chink – but it’s quite lively! The males often sing during the breeding season which can vary pleasingly if heard up close; some might even think this type of Behavior gives off an airy feel due to its lightness over substance quality with its tone.

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_grosbeak

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

The Blue Jay is a familiar bird in North America, and it’s one of the few blue jays in the world. This bird has a powder-blue back, wings, and tail. The head and chest are a darker blue, and there is a white patch on the forehead.

Blue Jays live in forests, parks, and yards all over North America. They eat seeds, insects, and other small animals. Blue Jays are very noisy birds and can be heard calling each other from far away.

Blue Jays are known to take and eat eggs, nestlings of other birds but only 1% had evidence in their stomachs. Most diets consisted of insects or nuts with the occasional insect being taken by these curious animals.

Females will occasionally help feed young after they’ve hatched because it makes them feel useful- this behavior was studied extensively among blue jays where almost all subjects were observed performing such acts of parental care. Read more about the blue jay symbolism here.

See also: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue_Jay/overview

Common Kingfisher

Common Kingfisher

The Common Kingfisher is a colorful bird found in Africa and parts of Asia. This bird has a blue back, white chest, and blackhead and wings.

CommonKingfishers live along rivers and lakes, where they catch fish for food. They also eat other small animals, such as insects and frogs. Pied Kingfishers are very good at catching fish. They dive into the water to get them and then fly away with them in their beak.

The common kingfisher is a small bird that hunts from perches 1-2 m (3-7 ft) above the water. This bill points down as it searches for prey, and when food is detected with its keen eyesight – it bobs its head before diving steeply underwater to seize what could be up close or less than 25 cm (10 in.) below surface level. The wings are opened during this process so they can beat against any potential threats like other aquatic animals looking for an easy meal themselves; after beating off these smaller creatures if necessary by flapping hard enough back towards land–the fish is adjusted at this point until held near one’s tail again then beaten upon their rock-solid breast – the common kingfisher will swallow it head-first and whole. Read more about the Kingfisher symbolism here.

See also: https://ebird.org/species/comkin1

Common House-Martin

Common House-Martin

The Common House-Martin is a small bird found in Europe and Asia. This bird has a blue back, white chest, and black head.

House Martins are small birds with sleek blue-black upper parts and pure white underbellies. They have distinctive forked tails that give them an appearance like planes, as well their wings which tend to be rounded rather than sharp so they can fly better in tight places or when chasing after prey! These quick flyers habitually nest below rooftops where you’ll often find thousands upon generations within just one bird’s family unit – this means it’s not uncommon at all for homes containing multiple nests inside themselves (amazing right?). Summertime visitors from Northern Europe spend winters across Africa.

See also: https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/wildlife-guides/bird-a-z/house-martin/

Tree Swallow

Tree Swallow

The Tree Swallow is a small bird found in North America. This bird has a blue back, white chest, and black head.

Tree Swallows are tiny birds with slim bodies that have light blue-grey backs and pale grey underparts. Their heads are mostly dark except for the area around their bill which looks like it’s wearing an upturned collar! These agile flyers can be identified by their swift flight pattern as well as how easily they fly up into trees then dive down to catch insects on the wing or even fish at times! Birds living away from water will eat berries too–this type of food makes them much more active than those who prefer wetter areas because there’s always something close by containing these tasty treats constantly ready to be eaten. Read more about the swallow symbolism here.

See also: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tree_Swallow/id

Cerulean Warbler

Cerulean Warbler

The Cerulean Warbler is a small bird found in North America. This bird has a blue back, white chest, and black head.

Cerulean Warblers are beautiful birds that have deep blue backs and bright white chests. They also have black heads with light blue stripes. These warblers live in forests where they eat insects. They can be difficult to see because they stay high up in the trees.

It hops along branches high in the canopy. Often forages near gaps in between tree trunks, but will venture quite far from these protected areas if food sources such as insects or fruit become abundant enough! Males sing a buzzy song that ascends higher and higher until it reaches their female counterparts below them on a branch- abundantly lined with sharp piano keys ready to create new life through music whenever they so choose and then finally descend back down again after being spent.

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerulean_warbler

Indigo Bunting

The Indigo Bunting is a small bird found in North America. This bird has a blue back, white chest, and black head.

Indigo Buntings are beautiful birds that have deep blue backs and bright white chests. They also have black heads with light blue stripes. These buntings live in open areas where they eat insects. They can be difficult to see because they stay high up in the trees. Males sing a song that sounds like “zee-zee-zee”. Females build nests out of grass and other materials. The eggs are greenish or bluish-white with brown spots.

Indigo Buntings are a solitary species during the breeding season but form large flocks when migrating and on their wintering grounds. They prefer to sing from treetops or shrubs with insects as food sources; this includes almost any bug you can imagine! If attracted by thistle seeds in your backyard though- be sure not to let those go too long before eating them because it’s been noticed that these little birds will eat anything if given enough time… including something potentially harmful like poison ivy.

The Male Indigo Bunting has an amazing way which he uses for singing: He simply swings his tail back -and forth-, while perching himself up somewhere else (such as on a wire or open tree), to bring attention towards his lovely voice that he’s using as bait in order to attract a mate (or just passerby’s in general who might want to stop and listen for a bit before moving along). This “tail-flicking” display is also used as part of territorial disputes with other males!

See also: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Indigo_Bunting/id

Eastern bluebird

Eastern bluebird

Eastern bluebird birds are social and can sometimes be found in flocks of over a hundred. They become territorial during the breeding season, but it’s not uncommon for them to defend feeding areas even when there is no threat present because their brains tell them that this land was theirs first!

In fact, eastern breeders have such strong grazing instincts they will eat anything from caterpillars all the way up through grubs if given half-chance – much like cows on our farm do with grasses at harvest time.

The Eastern Bluebird is a shy bird that perches erect on wires, posts, and low branches in open country. They scan the ground for prey with their bill lowered to look at any insects or fruit it may encounter while feeding by dropping down onto smaller animals like mice who live beneath your house! This beautiful songbird commonly uses nest boxes as well old woodpecker holes but if you want an even better view then head into deeper territory where these guys often gather berries during fall months – watch out though because this tasty treat might just get away before they’re finished eating. Read more about the bluebird symbolism here.

See also: https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/eastern-bluebird

Bluethroat

The Bluethroat is a small passerine bird that breeds in Europe and Asia. It is migratory, wintering in Africa.

This medium-sized warbler has a blue throat, breast, and head, and a brown back. The sexes are similar. The male sings a clear whistled song from an exposed perch.

Male birds sing a clear whistled song from an exposed perch which can be heard from some distance away. They sometimes form mixed-species foraging flocks in winter, when they are often found with tits or buntings.

Bluethroats breed on low vegetation in damp environments, such as wet meadows and marshes. They make a cup-shaped nest from grasses and sedges, concealed in dense vegetation near water. Four to six eggs are laid; these are blueish white with dark spots towards the larger end. The bluethroat is similar in appearance throughout its range but varies clinically in size across Europe; birds become smaller further east into Siberia. Birds also become paler above from west to east through Scandinavia where this species may overlap slightly with the common redstart at higher altitudes of up to 1500 m ASL. It winters mainly in Africa, where it is found in a wide range of habitats including open country, woodland, scrub, and gardens.

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluethroat

Honeycreeper

red-legged Honeycreeper

The red-legged Honeycreeper is a species of bird in the Ramphastidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, and Venezuela.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forests.

This beautiful songbird has adapted to human activity by learning how much sweetness there may be in fruits like bananas which we leave out on trees for them because it’s always nice when they’re hand-fed; something that will often bring birds closer but can also cause them to become too dependent upon humans – this means you might not see as many blue honeycreepers around your property anymore if you stop leaving food outside! Birds have even been known to take food from people’s hands and will sometimes land on heads or shoulders looking for a snack.

The red-legged honeycreeper is about 12 cm long and has mainly blue plumage, except for the black primary feathers and white secondary feathers of its wings. It has a long tail, which is tipped in blue. The male is slightly brighter than the female.

The song of the red-legged honeycreeper is a series of clear whistles, trills, and chirps.

See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honeycreeper

Great blue heron

Great blue heron

The great blue heron is a large wading bird with a widespread distribution. It breeds in much of North America, Central America, and the Caribbean but is resident in South America only on Trinidad and some other islands close to Venezuela’s coast. Birds that breed further north migrate southwards for winter.

This beautiful bird has an imposing size – standing up to 100 cm tall – which can be both intimidating yet impressive at once because it means you have one big protector around your property! Birds are often seen patrolling creeks or lakes looking out for fish or frogs although they will also eat insects when times get tough so don’t expect them to just sit there all day waiting for something interesting to happen; this could mean being approached by their long legs in the water or at your front door – scaring off possible intruders. Birds that are blue don’t necessarily have to be very big though but they may opt for a camouflage tactic of blending into their surroundings, which is what this great blue heron might be doing if it’s resting on a branch near you!

Great Blue Herons fly with slow steady wing beats and long glides on tilted wings. Read more about the Heron symbolism here.

See also: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/id

Blue-gray Tanager

Blue-gray Tanager

The blue-gray tanager is a medium-sized passerine bird. It is a resident breeder in the Neotropics from southeastern Mexico south to western Ecuador, northern Argentina and Uruguay. Birds of southern South America east of the Andes are sometimes included as subspecies within this species (see taxonomy).

This beautiful songbird can be seen all around your property but they will always prefer higher perches where they sing melodic songs that sound like bells ringing through your garden – if you’re lucky enough! Birds often forage with other small birds although it’s not yet clear what their favorite foods might be so don’t go leaving out any exotic fruits or veggies just yet as we do not know how much these may attract them;

The blue-gray tanager is a common, restless, and noisy bird. It usually lives in pairs or small groups but can be found mostly on fruit with some nectar drinking habits as well. This species thrives around human habitation where it takes delight from taking papayas (Carica papaya) which are one of its favorite foods!

See also: https://ebird.org/species/bugtan

 If you are interested, also check out our comparison of Bluebird Vs Blue Jay. 

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